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Buildings With Approved Plans To Enjoy FG’s Compensation

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Senior Special Adviser to the President on National Assembly, Senator Ita Enang has said that compensation will be paid for only the existing structures in 1976/77 with approved building plans on the Calabar-Itu federal road now under construction.
Evang said this on Monday, while inspecting the dualisation project at the Itam axis of the road.
He said that the Federal Government would not pay any compensation on new structures that sprang up when the Federal Government started dualising the road.
The presidential aide said he was in Akwa Ibom to inspect the work done on the road by Julius Berger.
He said that he was also in the state to take a prospective contractor, Arab Contractors Nig. Ltd. on recognisance visit of an 18 kilometre road project to be awarded by the federal government.
“I have observed that on the Calabar-Itu road, particularly from Oku Iboku, Ikot Ukap Itam and Mbak Obio Item, people have started building many huts and kiosks along the road.
“I want to tell them that government will not pay for such structures.
“This is because before the contract was awarded and project announced there was a recognisance that showed the property that were to be compensated for.
“So, you don’t just see the company coming and then you go to build something that was not taken account of at the time the cost of the project was determined.
“People should know that before you are paid any compensation, you have to have building plan approval, an approval that showed that you have right to build in that place.
“That approval to build shows that you owned the land. It is not because you erect the structure and you are entitled for compensation.
“You must be the person that owns the land and it must have been part of the area that was acquired during the 1976/77 construction of that road,” he said.
He advised those building along the road to steer clear the shoulder of the road, drains and areas kept for setback to avoid federal government wrath.
He said that Buhari was committed to the construction and completion of the Calabar-Itu-Ikot Ekpene road.
Enang said Julius Berger would work from kilometre 60 in Itam to Ayadehe Bridge in Itu Local Government Area while another contractor would handle from that point to Ibiakpan junction by Uyo-Ikot Ekpene road.
He said that funds were already available in the 2018 budget for the 18 kilometre road project.
Also speaking, Controller, Federal Ministry of Works, Akwa Ibom, Mr Nkereuwem Ukpong, said apart from Calabar-Itu road project, the Federal Government had also awarded Abak- Ekparakwa -Ette road contract.
“We have other projects that are still under construction in the state; you cannot measure them in kilometres because they are bridge projects.
“Already there is N11billion for this project in the 2018 budget; it has not been used yet. So there is money for the construction of this road.
“We came for recognisance with the contractor that is going to execute the project. After that, we do the measurement and carry out the design, then the procurement process will follow,” he said.

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Housing/Property

‘Why There Are Vacant Properties In Rivers’

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A Port Harcourt based real estate expert, Mr Atabebhunu Peters, has listed a number of reasons why many building properties are vacant in Rivers State.
Peters, who spoke to The Tide in an interview, yesterday, in Port Harcourt, noted that top on the list was the poor management of the security challenges in the state.
He explained that the security challenges in the state has not been adequately addressed and this has caused a lot of individuals and corporate bodies to leave the state.
According to him, “security challenges in the state play a role. A lot of people have left this state, companies have also left, that’s why you see these vacant properties littering the state.”
He lamented that even embassies have left the state which he said, has brought inconveniences to those seeking visas to foreign countries.
Peters also observed that the economic situaton of the country has also contributed to the housing challenge in the state, noting that in cases where the fortunes of a family have dwindled, they would be more concerned about feeding and, “not buying of properties’’.
He explained that due to the economic crunch being experienced in the country, some employers have downsized, making the affected workers to either move to smaller apartments or relocate from Port Harcourt city into the rural areas.
He also noted that the mortgage system in the country was not favourable to real estate practitioners, pointing out that in other climes, properties were built by developers with mortgage funding while prospect buyers purchase and pay back within 20-30 years.
Meanwhile, the real estate expert also identified double taxation as a bane to the development of the real estate industry, saying “these costs would be built into the cost of the property and it makes the average worker not to be able to afford the property, they thereby stand vacant for months or years.”
He expressed unhappiness that in spite of government outlawing what is popularly known as “marching ground,” community members were still demanding it which he noted sometimes runs in to six figures.
He regretted that many youths in the state allowed themselves to be used to destroy the once peaceful disposition of the state and appealed to them to engage themselves with gainful ventures that would not only build the state’s economy but also give them financial freedom.

 

Tonye Nria-Dappa

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Housing/Property

UN Moves To Provide Advanced Urbanisation In Africa …Says 90% Of Africans Live In Informal Housing

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The United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) has urged concerted efforts to create advanced urbanisation as an estimated 90 per cent of Africa’s population live in informal housing.
Director of the Africa Centre for Statistics at the ECA, Oliver Chinganya, made the call during a two-day Global Forum on Human Settlements (GFHS 2019) in Addis Ababa, recently.
The theme of the forum is “Sustainable Development of Cities and Human Settlements in the Digital Era”.
Chinganya stressed that “human settlement must be thought of in terms of quality of life and levels of satisfaction of basic needs’’.
The director deplored the fact that an estimated 60 to 70 per cent of urban households live in slums and close to 90 per cent of the population in Africa live in informal housing.
“This is a large share of the population that live in overcrowded, unhealthy and risky environments,’’ the ECA official said.
Chinganya added that the informal housing across Africa “lack the basic services and social protections that many of us here take for granted, such as clean and safe water, a decent toilet, title deeds or rental agreements, among others’’.
Chinganya further said that all sorts of discussions on smart cities and the digital citizenry must be conducted with the understanding that only a third of Africans are on the internet.
“The digital infrastructures are far from the world’s best in terms of speed, volume, and reliability.’’
Over the past two days, close to 500 experts and policymakers, who are drawn from 52 countries worldwide, have been sharing innovative policies, strategies, technologies and examples on sustainable cities and human settlements towards the betterment of cities and the lives of urban dwellers.
The forum, among other things, explored how to harness huge opportunities arising from the digital revolution to upgrade the planning, construction and management of cities and human settlements, and make them greener, smarter and more sustainable.

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Housing/Property

Architect Laments Activities Of Quacks In Building Industry

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A design expert in the real estate sector of the economy, Mr Ebi Bozimo, has decried the activities of quacks in the building industry, describing it as a menace to the growth of the industry in the country.
Bozimo made this declaration in a chat with The Tide on Monday, in Port Harcourt.
Bozimo, who is the Vice Chairman, Nigeria Institute of Architects (NIA), Rivers Chapter, noted that the activities of quacks in the built environment was contributory to the incessant building collapse in the country and vowed that NIS would clamp down on them.
He said that architecture was pivotal to housing development and should not accommodate quacks to plague its growth.
Bozimo, who is also the Project Manager of Rainbow Town Limited in Port Harcourt, however, assured the commitment of architects towards improving the aesthetics of the state, while not compromising the structural integrity of buildings.
He explained: “the job of an architect is to design functional spaces that are aesthetically appealing both to the property owner and the environment from the start of the project to finish with durability of the building in mind’’.
He urged architects to constantly develop themselves in order to keep abreast with modern techniques and practices so as to give their clients value for their money.

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